How to: Make a Mini Aosta Sweater (for your wine bottle) 🍷

I’m very lucky to say that I’ve seen some pretty cool things in my life, ranging from a ninth-century gold coin that was probably made by Vikings (really!) to a real life shipwreck, and who knows what else in between. None of them, however, compare to this sweater that I made for my wine bottle. I know. You didn’t know you needed it, but now you really do. So, here’s a post on how to make a Mini Aosta Sweater of your very own.

This little project started life as a mock-up of my Aosta Sweater (coming soon!). But it soon became clear that it was so much more than this when I realised it was the perfect size for a bottle of lovely red wine. And, thus, a wine sweater was born.

Of course, you could use it for many other purposes! It would be great for a doll or a little teddy bear. Or, you could use the same method to make a prototype of a sweater in another stitch.

You can download a PDF of the pattern here, or keep reading for the instructions.

So, let’s get into it!

Notes for pattern

You will need a set of 5mm double pointed knitting needles. You could also use a 5mm long circular needle and make the mini sweater using the magic loop method. You will also need 8 stitch markers (make sure one is in a contrasting colour to mark the beginning of the round), a darning needle, and approximately 50g of Petite Wool by We Are Knitters (or any alternative yarn that can be worked on 5mm needles).

This Mini Aosta Sweater uses Andalusian stitch and 1×1 rib stitch. These are very simple but look very effective at any scale.

Andalusian stitch is worked in the round as follows:
Round 1: Knit all stitches
Round 2: Knit all stitches
Round 3: *Knit 1, purl 1*
Round 4: Knit all stitches

1×1 rib stitch is worked as follows:
Round 1: *knit 1, purl 1*, repeat until there is 1 stitch left on your needle. Knit 1.

Any section written between * and * is to be repeated until the end of the round, unless otherwise stated.

You will need to know how to K2tog, make 1 left (M1L) and make 1 right (M1R). I wrote a post explaining how to work the leaning increaeses, which you can find here. K2tog just means that you knit 2 stitches together as if they were 1, decreasing your work by 1 stitch. You will also need to know how to work a knitted cast on (or any other method for casting on new stitches in the middle of a row) and how to pick up and knit stitches.

Collar

Cast on 24 stitches. Join to work in the round, making sure that you don’t twist your stitches. Place a stitch marker at the beginning of the round.

Work 4 rounds in 1×1 rib stitch.

Fold the collar in half so that you can pick up stitches from the cast-on edge. Work these cast-on stitches together with the stitches on your needle in 1×1 rib stitch, so that the collar is folded over in a little tube. For the next round, make sure that the cast-on edge is ‘inside’ the sweater, so that it transitions seamlessly into the yoke.

Alternatively, you can skip this step and sew the collar into a fold at the end and work 1 more round of 1×1 rib stitch.

At the same time as working the fold/extra round, place stitch markers as follows:

BOR marker, 1 raglan stitch, place marker, 3 stitches, place marker, 1 raglan stitch, place marker, 7 stitches, place marker, 1 raglan stitch, place marker, 3 stitches, place marker, 1 raglan stitch, place marker, 7 stitches.

Yoke

Begin working raglan increases whilst maintaining Andalusian stitch. Increases are made in Rounds 1 and 3. This means:

Round 1: slip BOR marker, knit 1 raglan stitch, slip marker, M1L, knit to the next marker, M1R, slip marker, knit 1 raglan stitch, slip marker, M1L, knit to the next marker, M1R, slip marker, knit 1 raglan stitch, slip marker, M1L, knit to the next marker, M1R, slip marker, knit 1 raglan stitch, slip marker, M1L, knit to the next marker, M1R.
You have increased 8 stitches.

Round 2: Knit all stitches.

Round 3: slip BOR marker, knit 1 raglan stitch, slip marker, M1L, *purl 1, knit 1*, repeat until 1 stitch before the next marker, purl 1, knit 3 stitches, M1R, slip marker, knit 1 raglan stitch, slip marker, M1L, *purl 1, knit 1*, repeat until 1 stitch before the next marker, purl 1, M1R, slip marker, knit 1 raglan stitch, slip marker, M1L, *purl 1, knit 1*, repeat until 1 stitch before the next marker, purl 1, M1R, slip marker, knit 1 raglan stitch, slip marker, M1L, *purl 1, knit 1*, repeat until 1 stitch before the next marker, purl 1, M1R.
You have increased 8 stitches.
Note: this sounds more complicated than it is, I promise. You need to start and finish each section (sleeve, body, sleeve, body) with a purl stitch, but all you are doing is alternating purls and knits. Make sure to familiarise yourself with Andalusian stitch and to read these instructions carefully and you’ll be fine!

Round 4: Knit all stitches.

Repeat these 4 rows a further 3.5 times (i.e., finish your increases on round 2) until you have worked 16 rounds of increases. By this point, you should have a total of 80 stitches that are divided between each section as follows:

BOR marker, 1 raglan stitch, place marker, 17 stitches, place marker, 1 raglan stitch, place marker, 21 stitches, place marker, 1 raglan stitch, place marker, 17 stitches, place marker, 1 raglan stitch, place marker, 21 stitches.

You can use this table to help you keep track of how many stitches you should have between each section on every increase round:

BodySleeveBodySleeveRaglansTotal
Set up7373424
Round 19595432
Round 3117117440
Round 5139139448
Round 715111511456
Round 917131713464
Round 1119151915472
Round 1321172117480
Guide to stitch counts for the mini sweater after each set of increases

Divide the body and sleeves

In the next round, we will separate the body and the sleeves and cast on some new underarm stitches as we go. Remember that this is Round 3 of the pattern, so it needs to be worked with alternating purls and knits. You can remove all of the markers apart from the BOR marker as you go.

Slip BOR marker, knit 1 raglan stitch, cast on 3 new stitches using the knitted cast on method, slip the next 17 stitches onto a spare piece of yarn and leave them to rest, knit raglan 1 stitch, *purl 1, knit 1* until 1 stitch before the next marker, purl 1 stitch, knit 1 raglan stitch, cast on 3 new stitches using the knitted cast on method, slip the next 17 stitches onto a space piece of yarn and leave them to rest, knit 1 raglan stitch, *purl 1, knit 1* until 1 stitch before the next marker, purl 1 stitch.
You now have 49 live stitches and 34 stitches on hold.

Leave the sleeve stitches to rest until the body is complete.

The Mini Aosta Sweater should start to look like a proper garment now.

Body

Work a further 12 rounds in Andalusian stitch. This means:
Round 1: Knit all stitches
Round 2: Knit all stitches
Round 3: *Knit 1, purl 1* until 1 stitch before the next marker, knit 1
Round 4: Knit all stitches

Next, work 3 rounds in 1×1 rib stitch.

Cast off all stitches in rib.

The Mini Aosta Sweater is really taking shape now!

Sleeves

We will now resume working the stitches that have been left on hold and pick up some new stitches from the underarm cast-on.

Slip the resting stitches from the first sleeve back onto your 5mm needles.

With your live yarn, pick up and knit three stitches from the cast-on edge at the underarm and then work the rest of the round like normal. Remember that this is Round 3 of the pattern, so it needs to be worked with alternating purls and knits. This means:
Knit the three new stitches, *purl 1, knit 1* until there is 1 stitch left in the round, purl 1.
You now have a total of 20 stitches.

Work a further 16 rounds in Andalusian stitch. This means:
Round 1: Knit all stitches
Round 2: Knit all stitches
Round 3: *Knit 1, purl 1*
Round 4: Knit all stitches

In the next round, *k2tog* until the end of the round. You now have 10 stitches.

Work 3 rounds in 1×1 rib.

Cast off in rib.

Repeat for the second sleeve.

Finishing

Weave in your ends and, if you fancy, block your work. I really don’t think it’s necessary for this project as it’s most likely decorative, but who am I to stop you?!


And that’s it! I hope you have fun with this little project; I know I did! It’s a great project to keep you occupied in the evening and if you are new to working raglan sweaters. If you’re interested in other patterns that use this technique, why not check out my Lucca Cardigan?

If you do make this Mini Aosta Sweater, please make sure to tag me @the_knit_purl_girl on Instagram using the hashtag #MiniAostaSweater as I’d love to see your creations!

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